Bringing your pet to Spain

Life in Spain Wed, 12 Jun 2013
Bringing your pet to Spain

If you have been frustrated by the intransigence of the European quarantine laws when organising pet travel to Spain, then you might be delighted to hear that there are plans for the laws to be relaxed. New EU legislation has been proposed that will apply to cats, dogs and ferrets that should make the process of transportation easier for some.

You will still need a pet passport which certifies the animal’s health and your pet will need to have a microchip inserted into its neck. The passport will need to include details of the most recent rabies vaccination. However, kittens and puppies that are not yet immune will be allowed to travel.

If you have a small menagerie and were planning to bring more than one pet with you then now you can legally migrate up to five animals at any one time. However, you will have to prove that you are on your way to a show, exhibition, competition or another type of sporting event. Don’t book your airline ticket just yet though as the proposed legislation has still to be formally approved.

Pets in Spain

The good news for those who do bring their pets with them, is that there are plenty of vets available to look after your pets in Spain and the climate should be as enjoyable for them as it is for you.

When you bring your animal with you, remember that the laws that you would expect to apply in your home country are also likely to apply in Spain too.  So, for example, you will be liable for your pet and may wish to take out liability insurance just in case anything goes wrong. Vet bills are also expensive in Spain and you might want to consider taking out insurance to cover the possibility of illness.

It may not always seem to be observed in practice but it is illegal to take a dog on a Spanish beach and dogs have to be kept on a lead in a public place. If the dog is classified as being dangerous then it must wear also wear a muzzle.

If you do bring your pet over with you, make sure that you keep up with their vaccinations. In particular be aware that mosquitoes can be a danger and avoid your animal being out at the time of night when they are most likely to be around or taking your animal to a marsh or other mosquito haven.

 

Something else to watch out for is the processionary caterpillar. This creature isn’t a year-round threat but when it does make an appearance its poisonous hairs can cause respiratory problems. Forums are usually good at alerting local residents when the caterpillars have been spotted and how to avoid them.

So, if you were unsure about whether to bring your pet along with you perhaps this article will have convinced you that it’s not such a bad idea after all.  

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